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Why is Chocolate Bad for my Dog?


Topics | Health
Posted | February 1, 2019

Why is Chocolate Bad for my Dog?

Ever wonder why chocolate is so bad for dogs when it's one of our favorite flavors? Chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine. The severity of chocolate toxicity varies greatly depending on the type of chocolate ingested and the size of the pet. The darker and less sweet the chocolate, the more toxic it can be. Baker's chocolate and dark chocolate pose the greatest risk of toxicity, while white chocolate carries the lowest risk. Theobromine can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, tremors, seizures, a racing heartbeat that leads to abnormal rhythms, and death in severe cases.

Ingestion of the wrappers can sometimes cause an obstruction. It is important to be aware that some chocolate contains toxins such as macadamia nuts, raisins, espresso beans, or xylitol.

Another serious risk associated with chocolate ingestion is pancreatitis. Pancreatitis results after eating an abnormally high-fat meal that the pancreas has to work harder to digest, which then leads to inflammation, pain, and potentially severe metabolic disease. Key signs of pancreatitis are vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain.

Call your veterinarian immediately if your dog gets into that Valentine chocolate stash you've been saving! Another good resource is the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Hotline.


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Why is Chocolate Bad for my Dog?


Topics | Health
Posted | February 1, 2019



Why is Chocolate Bad for my Dog?

Ever wonder why chocolate is so bad for dogs when it's one of our favorite flavors? Chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine. The severity of chocolate toxicity varies greatly depending on the type of chocolate ingested and the size of the pet. The darker and less sweet the chocolate, the more toxic it can be. Baker's chocolate and dark chocolate pose the greatest risk of toxicity, while white chocolate carries the lowest risk. Theobromine can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, tremors, seizures, a racing heartbeat that leads to abnormal rhythms, and death in severe cases.

Ingestion of the wrappers can sometimes cause an obstruction. It is important to be aware that some chocolate contains toxins such as macadamia nuts, raisins, espresso beans, or xylitol.

Another serious risk associated with chocolate ingestion is pancreatitis. Pancreatitis results after eating an abnormally high-fat meal that the pancreas has to work harder to digest, which then leads to inflammation, pain, and potentially severe metabolic disease. Key signs of pancreatitis are vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain.

Call your veterinarian immediately if your dog gets into that Valentine chocolate stash you've been saving! Another good resource is the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Hotline.


Share this post